naso's song

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Ovid’s Garden: Digging!

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On a cold and wet day in November, a group of volunteers from the Classics & Ancient History department at the University of Birmingham and staff from Winterbourne House & Gardens braved the elements to begin work on Ovid’s Garden! We had the muddy task of lifting the turf from the site and digging the main path in front of the garden to make way for the hard landscaping elements.Blog MontageFuelled by some excellent cake and brownies, we lifted all the turf by midday and by the afternoon the site was completely cleared. Whilst digging the main path, we even unearthed some exciting finds, excavating clay pipes and pieces of pottery, identified by our resident archaeologist Meagan Mangum, which will be displayed at Winterbourne for visitors to see!ExcavatingNow the turf and the main pathway have been dug, the beds have been marked out and the remaining paths around these will need to be dug out as well. After this, edging will go around the plot and beds, then a sub base will go into the pathways before gravel is put over the top. The next step will be to prepare the beds and plant the bulbs. PlotSpecial thanks goes to the volunteers from the Classics & Ancient History department at University of Birmingham who gave up their valuable time for a day of digging in the rain with me – Meagan Mangum, Ruth Léger and Phil Myers; and also to the gardeners and volunteers from Winterbourne.
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2 thoughts on “Ovid’s Garden: Digging!

  1. Hey Kiddo!

    Getting your hands dirty at last I see. You’ll soon be missing the nice warm desk job, making tea for County Councillors!

    The site looks great already. Can’t wait to see it planted up.

    Love,

    Greg XX

    >

  2. Reblogged this on Rome and all that… and commented:
    Miriam’s amazing “Ovid’s Garden” project, located at Winterbourne House & Gardens (University of Birmingham) represents a laboratory space for her PhD on Classical echoes in Italian Renaissance gardens, and also an imaginative way for enthusiasts to help shape a cutting-edge research project here in Brum.

    Brava, Miriam!

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